Where there’s a will, there’s a way

The Life of a Completely Blind Iranian Programmer

Source: How I got through Docker’s censorship – Parham Doustdar’s Blog

The most interesting part is being blocked by both the country government and the companies based in other countries. You not only have to develop ways to make packet traffic flow from outside the country into your own, but also to make funds available to you locally.

Not an easy feat.

Apple Stole My Music. No, Seriously. | vellumatlanta

What Amber explained was exactly what I’d feared: through the Apple Music subscription, which I had, Apple now deletes files from its users’ computers. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple’s database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted. If Apple Music saw a file it didn’t recognize—which came up often, since I’m a freelance composer and have many music files

Source: Apple Stole My Music. No, Seriously. | vellumatlanta

Back to the torrents.

Now it’s the very opposite

Looked at from another angle, in the past soft food was more prestigious than crunchy food. I had always put this down to two factors. First, that soft food was refined food, refined in the same sense that metals are refined, processing out the dross and getting to the pure essence or nature of the food. Second, since only the rich could regularly afford laborious soft food (easily pounded or mashed roots being a major exception), soft food was desirable food.

Source: Of Soft Food, Now and in the Past | Rachel Laudan

Red Cross, an AT&T brand

Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern, who was hired to revitalize the charity, has cut hundreds of chapters and thousands of employees.

Source: How AT&T Execs Took Over the Red Cross and Hurt its Ability to Help People – ProPublica

What happens to chapters of the organization outside the US? A lot of them depend on assistance provided by the US Red Cross to enable better service.

Fuck all, is what happens to them.

The best explanation of the pro-life movement I’ve read

The first and most obvious reasoning is the concept that sex, under certain circumstances, warrants punishment, and an unwanted child is an acceptable, adequate form of punishment.

Source: Sluts, Souls, and the Oversimplification of the Pro-Life Movement | Meh, it’s Sarah.

It’s not that these people hate women. It is that they value the metaphysical concept of a soul over the real physical well-being of a person.

Politics favor the right genetic variances of the epidermis

As a white Anglo-Canadian, perhaps the most innocuous-seeming of all national identities, it’s been pretty easy to be an economic migrant really.

Source: The Wandering Academic, or How No One Seems to Notice that I Am an Economic Migrant. | Superfluous Answers to Necessary Questions

I’m brown, so I’m one of those hordes that take American jobs from Americans. I’m an undesirable that is only fit for certain lines of work, even though my work experience has been extremely varied.

It pays to be white.

vroooooom VROOOOOOOOOMMMM

Bernstein is interested in this phenomenon as “memeufacturing” — a couple of social-media stars (or garden-variety celebs) post viral videos of themselves using an obscure gadget, and halfway around the world, factories shut down their e-cig lines and convert them, almost overnight, to hoverboard manufacturing lines. Bernstein cites a source who says that there are 1,000 hoverboard factories in South China — and another one, Chic Smart, outside of Shanghai, that’s threatening to sue all the rest for patent infringement (good luck with that).

Source: Pre-mutated products: where did all those “hoverboards” come from? / Boing Boing

So we’re supposed to call them hoverboards? I want my real weather controlled, fusion powered DeLorean, then.

By the way, maybe the Segway would have been an actual, y’know, revolutionary product if it had looked like this to start with.

In the future we’ll say this was a template for future attacks.

The emails also reveal myriad surprises and previously unreported anecdotes, including one episode in which Sony spied on its own employees’ emails. Paradoxically, the hacked emails and documents provide a telling window into how and why such a disastrous hack succeeded and what companies need to do to protect themselves—which is precisely why Fortune has chosen to use this material. (For more on our thinking, see Editor’s Desk here.)

Source: Sony Pictures: Inside the Hack of the Century, Part 1 – Fortune

How can you protect an attack that comes from the place where you make a living? The consequences for these things range from unauthorized purchases to emptied bank accounts to complete identity theft.

The scary part is it will only get worse.

I Gave A Speech About Race To The Publishing Industry And No One Heard Me

Here is the thing about how discrimination works: No one ever comes right out and says, “We don’t want you.” In the publishing world, they don’t say, “We just don’t want your story.” They say, “We’re not sure you’re relatable” and “You don’t want to exclude anyone with your work.” They say, “We’re not sure who your audience is.”

Source: I Gave A Speech About Race To The Publishing Industry And No One Heard Me

I see this in food service all the time. I’ve gone to places to apply for FOH jobs and been told to wait for the chef to come talk to me.

They just automatically assumed I’m there to work in the kitchen.

No, if you tell a woman to smile you’re more of a bitch than a bitch

Men don’t get told to smile like it’s their job. I don’t go up to men and say, “hey, smile! You’re so HANDSOME when you smile!

Why don’t I do that? Because it’s weird and rude and it’s none of my business if you smile or not. I don’t know you, I don’t know what you’re going through. And you don’t exist to mold yourself into whatever I think you should be. Isn’t that cool, that you’re an autonomous person?

Source: smile, you bitch: being a woman in 2015 — Medium

I’ll admit that I’ve done my fair share of idiotic things. Like most I thought I meant well, but now I’m sure in most cases it is much more likely the women I talked to got irritated and annoyed, rather than pleased.

I’m glad there are people like Nora out there, who won’t take shit from anyone and will step up and say “this is not right and we need to change it.”

Twitter changed because it sought to be media itself, instead of underlying everyone else’s media.

Yet the two entities that are called “Twitter”—the San Francisco-based corporation and the character-delimited social network—are not entirely disconnected. And similarly, no matter how many features Twitter-the-company tacks on to draw in new people, it’s still captive to the whims of Twitter-the-network. Recently, I’ve started to wonder if the corporation is trapped in more than a nominal way. What if the network is one of the company’s greatest obstacles, especially when it comes to growth?

Source: The Decay of Twitter – The Atlantic

Truly, a citizen of the electronic world

Having a citizenship means that you have a place in the world, an allegiance to a state. That state is supposed to guarantee you certain rights, like freedom from arrest, imprisonment, torture, or surveillance – depending on which state you belong to. Hannah Arendt famously said that “citizenship is the right to have rights”. To tamper with ones citizenship is to endanger ones most fundamental rights. Without citizenship, we have no rights at all.

Algorithmic Citizenship is a form of citizenship which is not assigned at birth, or through complex legal documents, but through data. Like other computerised processes, it can happen at the speed of light, and it can happen over and over again, constantly revising and recalculating. It can split a single citizenship into an infinite number of sub-citizenships, and count and weight them over time to produce combinations of affiliations to different states.

Source: Algorithmic Citizenship | Citizen Ex