The text itself is the lie

GPT-3 is a communication revolution that threatens to eliminate the possibility of information about the original human intentionality behind a given text post.

Source: GPT-3: Informational Hyper-Inflation – Never Met a Science

Unless you see the name of someone who is a real human on a text you cannot be sure that text was written by an actual breathing human. Even then you’re not assured the text was actually written by a human, merely that it was vetted by a human who then decided it was okay to put their name to this text.

You still cannot be sure the text was actually written by them. As the author of that post says this will only help drive written media away giving priority to audio and video media.

How long until those are mediated by AI? Nvidia is already making a go at it with the purpose of reducing used bandwidth but it won’t be long before the tech is being used to fake entire appearances.

Oh, you want to setup a neighborhood network? They’ll throw the cops at you for that

Stephen Milton, who helped to design and build the Gigabit Now service in Sea Ranch, California explained that his company had to obtain permission from 23 separate local, county, and federal granting agencies to get the new project up and running. Broadband provider Sacred Wind out of New Mexico wrote in a filing to the FCC that an application involving one landowner and one authorizing jurisdiction commonly takes 2–4 years to complete, while something more complex, that involves more than one piece of land spanning multiple authorizing jurisdictions, can take anywhere from 4–8 years to complete. Slow response times translate into delays and adoption lags.

Source: The curious case of Romanian broadband | by Will Rinehart | The Benchmark | Oct, 2020 | Medium

Here in the US most of these bumps are by design by way of from redlining, NIMBYism, and plain old lack of foresight from local governments. This in turn gave more power to state governments who in turn receive most of their regulatory guidelines from the companies they’re supposed to be regulating. A lot of states now explicily forbid cities, counties, and municipalities from even trying to enact their own regulations when it comes to broadband, specially publicly owned infrastructure.

Wealthy neighborhoods will always see at least two companies deal with the regulatory gauntlet as they know the profits to be made will be worth it, which in turn helps attract more wealthy people to the neighborhood. Poor neighborhoods have not seen that kind of investment in decades, and will likely never see it in the foreseeable future. Here in Minneapolis one company is rolling out fiber throughout the city and North Minneapolis isn’t even in the plan for them. This has been a historical goal of racist and classist local governments.

Should government at any level try to change the rules, companies involved in last-mile telecom duopolies will scream bloody murder and call up their wholly owned GOP subsidiary in Congress to keep the status quo.

Organize album order in Flickr

I like Flickr. I have been a paying user for years, since the heady days of Web 2.0. Very photo, so web.

But their documentation fucking sucks. It went down in quality when Yahoo took over, and SmugMug isn’t doing much better. But anyway.

Here’s how to reorganize the order in which albums in the Flickr mobile app show up:

  1. Log in to Flickr on the web
  2. Go to the Albums & Collections section of the Organizr.
  3. At the top of the page make sure Viewing: All Albums is selected.
    Flickr Album Organizr
  4. On the right panel order the albums whichever way you want.

Making this change will have effect in two places:
– The Albums page on the web
Flickr Album page on website

  • The Albums page in the mobile App.
    Flickr Album page on Android mobile app

Neither the Flickr Help Center nor the Help Forum have any posts about this. Now, I’m using the Android app but I assume the iOS-based versions will also follow the ordering set in the Organizr panel.

I wish Flickr enabled a few things:
– Sorting by album metadata (alphabetically, album creation date)
– Sorting by picture metadata (make bigger/smaller albums show up first/last). This would include sorting by last album upload, so albums used the most get shown first.
– Make Collections a first-class citizen on the site. They’ve been relegated as a little used organization tool that no one uses and when it does get used it isn’t showcased.

Flickr has so much to win now that Instagram is being integrated ever more into facebook’s grubby infrastructure.

Night glow

        <a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/nullrend/">nullrend</a> posted a photo:
Night glow

Setting autumn

        <a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/nullrend/">nullrend</a> posted a photo:
Setting autumn