Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

Misidentifying who, exactly, rides bikes is hardly a new problem, Longhurst said. Historically, every generation has created a new idea of who rides a bike, but the older associations have stuck around, too.That creates a situation in which cyclists are simultaneously associated with elites displaying conspicuous consumption, those sacrificing for the good of society, competitive athletes, children, and sometimes those who are coming home from their job washing dishes at 2 a.m. because other options aren’t available.

Source: Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

I’m one of those people. Since I’m usually at work it is extremely hard for me to participate in initiatives to extend biking infrastructure here in Minneapolis. Same goes for most of the people who work in the service industry, regarless of their race or country of origin.

We bike because it’s cheap and convenient. And when you’re going home anytime after midnight, usually the only option you have to get home since taxis are relatively expensive and mass transit cuts service.

For each city…

Mexico City has it good. Most pressing concern is its population.
Mexico City google search

Minneapolis has is good too. People do love to bitch about the weather
Minneapolis google search

Saint Paul has baseball on its mind
Saint Paul google search

Tijuana is all over. Weather, the mythical donkey show, the cartel
Tijuana google search

Cuernavaca needs to get its shit together. Safety and crime at the top.
Cuernavaca google search

Fun thing is that weather is always in the suggestions, no matter what the city is.

Bouncing back and forth.

A month ago, I was moving from Minneapolis to Rochester to work at a store in which a family member is involved. The warning was the other partner was hard to work with and would grind you down if you let him.

He is a micromanager. He is an asshole. He is a bikeshedder.

In a month, he ground me down enough for me to explode at him. Merchandise was broken. I almost spent the night sleeping outside in 10°F weather.

Now I’m back in Minneapolis looking for a job to love, in which I at least have the freedom to sell the way I like to sell. To sharpen my skills and do what I love — working. Even dishwashing is a good job if you like to have people say “these are the cleanest dishes I’ve seen at a restaurant.” That’s what I want.

Sad part is, I saw what Rochester needs and wants and I think I would have been able to provide it, in time. Now I’m afraid I won’t ever have the chance.