Now it’s the very opposite

Looked at from another angle, in the past soft food was more prestigious than crunchy food. I had always put this down to two factors. First, that soft food was refined food, refined in the same sense that metals are refined, processing out the dross and getting to the pure essence or nature of the food. Second, since only the rich could regularly afford laborious soft food (easily pounded or mashed roots being a major exception), soft food was desirable food.

Source: Of Soft Food, Now and in the Past | Rachel Laudan

I didn’t know something like this was done

In the eighteenth century, artists in Mexico (and to a lesser extent in other parts of Latin America) created paintings that depicted the different racial mixtures.

Source: Slavery, Race, and Whiteness in Mexico

I didn’t know it had been so complicated back then. Sure, in history class at school we would delve into this sort of thing, but we’re learning it as kids and you don’t ever revisit it until you have kids of your own — unless you study history in one of it’s myriad forms.

50 Years After the Moynihan Report, Examining the Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration – The Atlantic

A longform article in The Atlantic.

In Douglass’s time, to stand up for black rights was to condone black criminality. The same was true in King’s time. The same is true today. Appearing on Meet the Press to discuss the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani—in the fashion of many others—responded to black critics of law enforcement exactly as his forebears would have: “How about you reduce crime? … The white police officers wouldn’t be there if you weren’t killing each other 70 to 75 percent of the time.”

The whole article is a very illustrating read on why things need to change.

This should be on the books

There was really no threat of invasion though. While the final battle between the Mexica and the Native/Spanish forces is often lumped together as the "Siege of Tenochtitlan" there were skirmishes and battles happening around the Lake Texcoco basin.

via 400-Rabbits comments on What were the fortifications of Tenochtitlan before Cortés' conquest?.

I had always imagined that the Siege was mostly an overland affair, never really taking into account the fact that the whole city was on an island. Yeah, sure, the fact Cortes had ships built is mentioned, but you can’t have a clear idea of how they were used with two or three paragraphs in a school history textbook.

It shows the influence of modern geography on the perception of events that happened centuries ago.