I just happen to be in the market for a new phone

Before, buying a Nexus meant you had to deal with a bad camera or poor battery life, but the Nexus 5X and 6P are the first Android devices built with few to no compromises. The one thing you could complain about is the lack of wireless charging, but we can deal with that. The camera on a Nexus is finally good. The 12.3 MP cameras can hang with phones that are nearly twice the price of the 5X.

Source: Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P review: The true flagships of the Android ecosystem | Ars Technica

I broke the screen on my Canon S100 and the camera on my Nexus 5 is not the best. So by all appearances either phone is a worthy upgrade.

Google Drive

It was just released to the wild, and yet I’ve already found cause to question the integrity of the product:

image

When looking at the list of installed apps, it’s asking me to update the app, when I know for a fact it hasn’t even been installed to my phone. I’m used a rooted phone and a custom ROM, so it’s not like T-Mobile just put it there without my knowledge.

That sort of behavior is disingenuous as best, and evil at worst. Can there now be any doubt Google has just become another company like the rest?

Plume 3

I wrote this review on the Android Market, but the service mangles all formatting so comments end up looking like crap.

I’m sorry to say that the interface changes implemented for 3.00 changed the app for the worse, just by removing two key piec…

I wrote this review on the Android Market, but the service mangles all formatting so comments end up looking like crap.

I’m sorry to say that the interface changes implemented for 3.00 changed the app for the worse, just by removing two key pieces of functionality:

  • “Go to top” option.
  • “Pull to Tweet.”

Between those two, your actions will be that much slower. Gone is the ability to begin a tweet, pull up to review your timeline, then pull down again to finish it. Looking through old tweets and want to get back to the top? Too bad, you’ll have to flick through all those tweets in between.

Interface now has a “Home” screen, allowing access to search, favorites, trends, lists and “columns”, headers for which are always displayed. From here you may setup which columns you want to see on the interface, and in which order. Sadly, the “home” screen itself cannot be removed. In previous versions the “home” column was the timeline, but apparently users cannot figure that out. This all makes for additional wasted screen space.

This new version feels, all in all, made by developers who firmly believe their users are idiots who need to be hand-held to use the app. You are better off staying with the last version of Plume 2.x, at least until that basic functionality is re-implemented.

Emphasis mine.

It looks to me that in their rush to make the app compatible with Android 4.0, the developers threw aside some of the things that made their app unique. These things had been there since the first versions of the app, so it makes you wonder if the Google UI guidelines were written with an “all our users are idiots” mentality.

These changes to the app made a lot of the things that were understood implicitly about functionality to be displayed explicitly. Attempting a better User Interface made for a poorer User Experience.

When it comes down to it, another case of the UserFriendly Police beating down a good app.